Forced Perspective Photography Using Toy Cars and Miniature Scenes

The idea behind the forced perspective photography is very simple, most of the photos created with this technique fakes your visual perception to the scene perspective.

So, the elements in the photo do not fit in the same size to each other as it looks like in real life.

The forced perspective is not a new tricks, actually it has been used in the old movies where the camera take shots for small monsters, while it appears huge and terrifying in the cinema screen.

Taking forced perspective photography is not that much hard. All you need is the creative idea and good understanding to the composition and global light applied to the elements in the shot such as Michael Paul’s project to create outdoor scenes for old American streets using small toy car models using the forced perspective photography techiques.

His Flickr profile includes amazing examples of how to use the forced perspective in a unique and creative approach such as the photos below.

miniature scenes

miniature scenes

Miachael Paul miniature scenes

Miachael Paul miniature scenes

Michael creates miniature scenes for old city streets using toy cars, buildings, people and trees. Then, he adds the miniature scene outdoor in front of existing builds. The correct measurement and analysis for the position of the miniature scene in front of the real objects creates this fake perspective. When the viewers see the shot, they cannot perceive the nature of the elements and believe they are all real objects.

forced perspective photos

forced perspective photos

forced perspective photography

forced perspective photography

In addition to the scene composition, the light plays an essential rule in the forced perspective photography in order to get the right perception of the reality of objects in the scene. Michael Paul’s project indicates that he has very good talent to control the light in both indoor and outdoor examples of his project.

The examples we see here reflect how he choose the right time in the day and light condition to make sure that all the miniature and real elements are having the same light direction and intensity.

forced perspective

forced perspective

Miachael Paul miniature scenes

Miachael Paul miniature scenes

In a intensive interview with Fstopper,Michael describes the project:

Keep everything in scale. From the thickness of the shingles down to the wallpaper design and door knobs, everything must be in the proper relationship to each other. I can’t stress that enough.

The photos courtesy in the article above for Michael Paul Smith and for more photos of his project and information about each shot, you can visit his Flickr profile.


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